Yel Ana (Cel Ene) (Turkish Yörük)

Guidance

When the sands are shifting, invoke this wind mother to provide the patience necessary to wait out the brewing storm.

Every where I turn there is a wall of shifting sand, blocking my line of sight.  It can be downright exhausting, trying to figure out the next move. The air seems stagnant and weighty in the world at this moment. Clients are all saying this very same thing.

So I turned my efforts toward a personal goal. In preparation to launch Winds of Spirit, I have been interviewing branding experts, coaches, and publicists. This is a positive action, a forward step in present time to assist these winds of spirit as they prepare to make their debut into the world, via my book, due to be  published in February 2018.* 

Yesterday during a conversation with a social media strategist,  I pulled a Winds of Spirit Card and whistled in a Wind for our call.  Yel Ana blew in to guide our conversation.  I was not surprised when Yel Ana appeared yet again as I called in a Wind for the Collective, which I do on a bi-weekly call, with Barbara Lucas.  We Whistled to the Wind.

Below is our 11-minute meditation and thought provoking dialogue about this powerful wind mother. Please listen, and feel free to add your comments below. 

 

Yel means wind, and Ana (Ene) means mother. Women were the caretakers of homes. (listen to the meditation conversation to learn how this wind mother is protecting her children) They oversaw the survival of the community, and were responsible for conducting tribal rituals. As the feminine aspect of the wind, Yel Ana represents a mother’s patience with her children, even when they misbehave. Women perfected the art of storytelling as a means to guide and teach their children. Their wisdom endured throughout the ages as the basis for religious mythology.

The appearance of Yel Ana signifies that a simoom is blowing through your life.

This is a time to pause, reflect, and be patient. Click To TweetLike the herders traveling through the desert, Yel Ana is asking you to bolster your faith and listen to your inner voice of wisdom before proceeding. This week, Yel Ana comes from the East, the place of mind, ideas, and new beliefs. The new idea for me this week is that is necessary to take cover, regain my strength, and wait for the storm to pass.

East

Ancestral nomads were keen observers of constellations and used the temperate night sky as their map to help them navigate safely through harsh, ever-changing landscapes. Yel Ana is beckoning you to observe your thoughts carefully; they will determine the quality and nature of your experiences as you journey through life. Like shifting sand in the wind, thoughts may mutate over time. Self-mastery requires patience, if you seek the truth during the inconstant phases of the moon.

If Yel Ana is pelting your backside with grains of sand, be on guard, because your mind may be playing tricks on you. Halt before proceeding, and ask, “Where am I out of sync? Am I hungry, angry, lonely, or tired?”

From my spiritual mentor:

'It is a destruction cycle in the universe—we can make things that result in new creation—but right now old things are crashing down.Click To Tweet It is important to stay insulated from political version of this—or at least stay neutral emotionally to that illusion—to see it as the possibility for new creation.  But new creations have to come from higher consciousness- or we recreate things the same (or worse) again.  So the trick now is try for the highest consciousness you can reach—love, oneness, forgiveness, compassion etc. before taking any action.  First detach from the destructions and collisions—then reach higher awareness – then act.” Cindy Lindsay.

*Winds of Spirit will be published in February 2018 by Hay House.  While you wait, you can learn about these ancient practices by joining our FB Group, Wind Believers.

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