The Wind Gourd of La 'amaomao (1990), all the winds of Hawaii were once contained in a supernatural gourdLa’amaomao (Distant Sacredness) Hawaiian Wind Goddess

Ancestor arrives from the West

According to the Mo’olelo Hawaii o Pakaa a me Ku-a-Pakaa, na Kahu Iwikuamoo o Keawenuiaumi, ke Alii o Hawaii, a o na Moopuna hoi a Laamaomao (c. 1902), translated into English as The Wind Gourd of La ‘amaomao (1990),  all the winds of Hawaii were once contained in a supernatural gourd.[1]  The calabash (gourd) served as the intermediary between its keeper and the 32 winds that originate at the horizon, rua matangi (wind pits).[2]  Pāka‘a inherited the wind gourd from his mother, La’amaomao, who was a descendant of the wind goddess bearing the same name.  When chanting and removing the Tapa (bark cloth) from directional holes in the gourd, Pāka‘a could invite hundreds of South Sea Islands trade winds for protection, bountiful harvests, and rain.

This sacred Mo’olelo (story) demonstrates the dynamic and vital relationship between the Hawaiian people, their language, and the world of nature in which they lived.

If the winds of La’amaomao, the sacred calabash, are stirring in your life, you are being called examine your past, present, and future relationships with people, places, and things in all areas of your life.

West

There is an abundance of natural resources on the land and in the surrounding sea of the seven Hawaiian Islands. [3] Before contact was established with the outside world, parcels of land known as Ahupua`a were shared by everyone. Each parcel was rich in natural resources and home to elemental spirits. Everyone had access to water, food, mountains, and the ocean. When La’amaomao blows in from the west, you are being advised to exercise aloha (love of the land). This is a good time to tend to your garden, stroll through nature, and pay attention to the daily and seasonal cycles.  Be kind and generous, and share your wealth with others.

Take an active role in solving community problems. Take a new step every day; be prudent in your use of water, create less waste, and recycle more often.  It is time to remember that planet Earth is like an island, possessing abundant resources and  the ability to regenerate when we show respect.

 

Compass Card Winds represent the cardinal directions and life cycle themes: More about the West Quadrant of the Compass Card

The west represents the harvest, which contains both the preservation and destruction of life—just like autumn, the season when crops are harvested and the fields are empty, but people’s bellies are full and the sharpness of the cooler air stimulates the senses. The invigorating chill and colorful palette of autumn can easily grab our attention, putting us at ease and possibly making us complacent. But this is actually a time to be alert, with our senses fully awakened.

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[1] The Wind Gourd of La ‘amaomao. Reviewed by Niklaus R. Schweizer, Professor of German, University of Hawai’i. The Hawaiian Journal of History. Vol. 25, 1991. 212-215. The Wind Gourd of La ‘amaomao. Reviewed by Niklaus R. Schweizer, Professor of German, University of Hawai’i. The Hawaiian Journal of History. Vol. 25, 1991. 212-215. http://www2.hawaii.edu/~dennisk/texts/schweizerwindgourd.html

[1] Translation– The Hawaiian Tradition of Pakaa and Ku-a-Pakaa, the Trusted Attendants of Keawenuiaumi, the King of Hawaii, and the Grandson of Laamaomao, Hoakalei Cultural Foundation. http://www.hoakaleifoundation.org Accessed on the web June 2016

[3] Mana Makani: The Power of the Wind, Online Learning Center, Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Honolulu, HA

http://resources.bishopmuseumeducation.org/resource_type/lesson/LM_Power_of_the_Wind_V04.pdf  Accessed on the Web. June 22, 2016

 

 

 

 

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